shortformblog:

Ever wonder what that “one weird trick” was, but too scared to click the ad? Fortunately, Slate reporter Alex Kaufman did all the heavy lifting for you. That’s right, he clicked the ads.

shortformblog:

Ever wonder what that “one weird trick” was, but too scared to click the ad? Fortunately, Slate reporter Alex Kaufman did all the heavy lifting for you. That’s right, he clicked the ads.

onaissues:

shortformblog:

Today in videos that will blow your mind: This is called a “Hyperlapse,” a time-lapse video built with a number of camera movements. This would be cool on its own (the process is generally very time-consuming), but the really awesome part is this: It was created using publicly-available Google Streetview data. There’s even a tool that helps you make your own. The results are rad in that way that few things are. I’m gonna stop talking now. Just watch.

Gorgeous use of publicly-available data!

shortformblog:

Because it’s that time of season, here’s a yule log (Taken with Cinemagram)

shortformblog:

Because it’s that time of season, here’s a yule log (Taken with Cinemagram)

"People are just very reactive online. Things happen very quickly and we expect to get quick results. In reality things take time. Our expectations of the speed at which things happen online is not matched by reality."

— Psychologist Nathalie Nahai • Speaking about how anger builds online in a very reactionary sense, which often manifests itself in a mob-like form. Anonymity is a major factor to this, Nahai says, as is the lack of clear human response. “There is no filter for this,” she says. “Social platforms provide one of those modes of communication where you can be absolutely horrendous and not worry about it. When we talk to someone on the phone we are primed to respond to voices and it’s a much more intimate way of communicating. When you remove social cues and reactions, it becomes easier to not think about it.” What do you think? Are you an angrier person online than you are in person? The Next Web’s article is targeted at startups, but if you ask us, there’s something in here we can all learn from. (via shortformblog)

(via shortformblog)

shortformblog:

  • 42 states had added jobs last month — the most in the past year
  • 29 states had decreases in unemployment in the past month
  • 13 states (and D.C.) stayed roughly the same with unemployment
  • eight states had increases in unemployment in the past month source

» Signs of overall improvement: Economists say that the modest growth the economy is showing is decent for now but could show much stronger results later in the year — a theory supported by the rise in consumer spending in February. Most notably, some states which were hard hit by the housing collapse are showing signs of life, including Florida (with an unemployment rate that’s fallen below 10 percent in the past year), Michigan (below 9 percent in part because of the auto industry’s rebound) and California (whose 10.9 percent unemployment is nonetheless much better than it was a year ago). Think the trend will keep ticking upward?

Hope so!

shortformblog:

Ever wonder what the ruins of the Titanic look like up close? Thanks to National Geographic, wonder no longer. Some stellar visuals gathered here, all thanks to the very difficult work of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, which spent many months poring over the below-the-ocean work. Oh, and spend a nice long while poring over the gallery. Trust us.

shortformblog:

Ever wonder what the ruins of the Titanic look like up close? Thanks to National Geographic, wonder no longer. Some stellar visuals gathered here, all thanks to the very difficult work of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, which spent many months poring over the below-the-ocean work. Oh, and spend a nice long while poring over the gallery. Trust us.

shortformblog:

Ever wonder how Newsweek made some of its more elaborate graphics back in the day? Check out this look back by Karl Gude, the magazine’s former Director of Information Graphics (and a current MSU professor), who discusses what it was like to create an insanely detailed graphic like this way back in 2001. In the case of this particular piece, it included dressing people up as soldiers. Seriously. Awesome piece. You’ll dig it.

shortformblog:

Ever wonder how Newsweek made some of its more elaborate graphics back in the day? Check out this look back by Karl Gude, the magazine’s former Director of Information Graphics (and a current MSU professor), who discusses what it was like to create an insanely detailed graphic like this way back in 2001. In the case of this particular piece, it included dressing people up as soldiers. Seriously. Awesome piece. You’ll dig it.

(via angelawublog)

shortformblog:

A somewhat different take on the thing we reblogged earlier, but it shows two very interesting things: First, Tumblr and Pinterest are timesucks in equal measure, and second, nobody’s actually hanging around Google+ once they sign up. The latter is the subject of this super-interesting Wall Street Journal piece. (EDIT: A good point: Don’t take that Twitter number at face value, as this graphic skips two key elements of the Twitter experience — mobile and third-party apps.)

shortformblog:

A somewhat different take on the thing we reblogged earlier, but it shows two very interesting things: First, Tumblr and Pinterest are timesucks in equal measure, and second, nobody’s actually hanging around Google+ once they sign up. The latter is the subject of this super-interesting Wall Street Journal piece. (EDIT: A good point: Don’t take that Twitter number at face value, as this graphic skips two key elements of the Twitter experience — mobile and third-party apps.)

(via shortformblog)

shortformblog:

inadvisable asks: Wait? How is that different from Tumblr? Same policy, yes?

» SFB says: Actually, not so much. This sell thing is actually a fairly notable difference. As Anthony De Rosa just pointed out on TwitterFacebook andTumblr don’t claim to have the right to sell your content, just to openly distribute it. Twitter does, but only in API formPinterest, meanwhile, says this:“By making available any Member Content through the Site, Application or Services, you hereby grant to Cold Brew Labs a worldwide, irrevocable, perpetual, non-exclusive, transferable, royalty-free license, with the right to sublicense, to use, copy, adapt, modify, distribute, license, sell, transfer, publicly display, publicly perform, transmit, stream, broadcast, access, view, and otherwise exploit such Member Content only on, through or by means of the Site, Application or Services.” That is a significant difference, and one that could hurt Pinterest among businesses. They may perhaps want to narrow that. — Ernie @ SFB

(Source: bizjournals.com, via shortformblog)

shortformblog:

How are these 60 people linked? Well, see, after Rick Ruzzamenti, upper left, decided to donate his kidney, it set off a chain of kidney donation that led to 30 people getting 30 kidneys from people they didn’t know. It was the ultimate case of paying it forward. Ruzzamenti’s selfless gesture inspired the loved ones of those receiving kidneys — who weren’t matches with their relatives — to commit similar acts of selflessness. The result, what the National Kidney Registry calls Chain 124, led to people in 11 states getting a new lease on life.

shortformblog:

How are these 60 people linked? Well, see, after Rick Ruzzamenti, upper left, decided to donate his kidney, it set off a chain of kidney donation that led to 30 people getting 30 kidneys from people they didn’t know. It was the ultimate case of paying it forward. Ruzzamenti’s selfless gesture inspired the loved ones of those receiving kidneys — who weren’t matches with their relatives — to commit similar acts of selflessness. The result, what the National Kidney Registry calls Chain 124, led to people in 11 states getting a new lease on life.

(via shortformblog)